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Seagate Backup Plus Slim External USB 3.0 2TB Hard Drive Review
  More Seagate Reviews... and Hard Drives/SSD.
Waterfield Designs Muzetto Leather Notebook Satchel Review
Kingston SSDNow V300 240GB SATA III SSD Review
Beginners Guide: How To Install / Remove an Intel Socket LGA2011 CPU
Beginners Guides: 99 Performance Tips for Windows

General News RSS News Feed - PCSTATS
... 71 news stories awaiting approval  
G.SKILL F3-10666CL9D-8GBSQ 2x4GB DDR3 Laptop
     Fri, Jul 22 2011 | 9:02A | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
If you have been paying attention to the computer industry, you will know DRAM pricing goes up and down like... well, DRAM pricing. Okay, a better comparison is probably like gas prices. While I am not any credible oil market expert by a long shot, sometimes you can't just help it to wonder things like, why is the pump price exactly the same when oil is less than $100 a barrel and $150 a barrel? Why does the local gas station's numbers goes up overnight when there is a hurricane off some random place no one has ever heard of, but for some reason it never goes back down when Middle East countries increases oil production the next day? And the list goes on and on. DRAM pricing is pretty much like the same thing, except the good news for us is, it goes down rather than up most of the time. For example, when we reviewed the G.SKILL F3-8500CL7D-8GBSQ 2x4GB SODIMM kit back in December 2009, the price tag hovered around a hefty $400 at most online retailers. A year and a half later, the same kit sells for less than sixty bucks. With that in mind, let's move straight into our review today. What we have here at APH Networks is the G.SKILL F3-10666CL9D-8GBSQ 2x4GB dual channel set, which is pretty much the same thing as the model represented by the long string of digits and letters I have just mentioned, except it operates at DDR3-1333 rather than DDR3-1066. Knowing DDR3-1333 is now the standard memory speed for all second generation Intel Core mobile processors, for an extra five bucks at press time, is this really the kit to get? We installed a set into our brand new, Sandy Bridge based Lenovo ThinkPad T420 laptop to find out.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 560 1GB OC Graphics Card
     Fri, Jul 22 2011 | 9:01A | Video Cards | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
When I mention the British Phonographic Industry, what is the first thing that comes to mind? Penthouse Magazine? Playboy UK? Well, my advice to you is, let's get your head out of the gutter, because what we are talking about here is the British Phonographic Industry, not the British Pornographic Industry. (On the other hand, it is interesting to point out most people get it wrong at first glance, too.) With that in mind, let me introduce to you the product we are reviewing today. The Gigabyte GeForce GTX 560 1GB OC, as its name suggests, is based off one of NVIDIA's latest GPU releases, the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560. Wait a second. Hasn't the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 been around since January? Fair enough, but like when we have mentioned British Phonographic Industry earlier, it is one of those things you can easily misread -- the one you are thinking about is probably the GTX 560 Ti. You know, the Titanium version, with more stream processors and texture units, combined with a marginally higher clock speed. The GV-N56GOC-1GI is based off the non-Ti version with a slight overclock to 830MHz core, 1660MHz shader, and 1002MHz memory; followed by a stream-texture-ROP configuration count of 336-56-32, respectively. Situated in the extremely competitive $200 MSRP market, and priced slightly below that at press time, how well does the usual Gigabyte approach of taking a standard GPU, install it on a custom PCB full of high quality components, slap on a custom cooler on top (Or under, depending on your perspective), fare in this ultra competitive market? Read on to find out what we have found!

Cubitek XL Tank Computer Case Review
     Fri, Jul 22 2011 | 9:00A | Cases | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Australia -- what a glorious country. I may be biased in my observations, but no one can deny its epicness: Riding kangaroos to work, having a conservative political party called "Liberals", celebrating Christmas in the summer, and having everything in general upside down are just a few things to mention. As truly nice as Australia is to live in, we are often hard done by hardware and software vendors who delay release of their products compared to the release dates in the United States. Take Apple's range of mobile devices, for example. They have only recently begun to release the iPhone and iPad worldwide on the same date. How about Microsoft? Same deal with Windows retail boxes appearing in stores months after their stateside release. Same again with most Android phones getting released in East Asia or Europe before Australia. But not all is futile. Take Cubitek, for example. Their XL Tank chassis was released in most major worldwide markets at the same time, Australia included. So we were really excited to have the chance of reviewing one of these cases in our Sydney office, for the first APH Review, Australian Edition! However, before moving on to the review itself, I would like to point out an unfortunate incident. You know, as Australia is well known for being the upside-down land and all (Both geographically and culturally), it's only natural that I have encountered some "technical difficulties" with some of my photography. But never fear; said issues were pretty much ironed out after the first photo. Let's move on and see what we found!

SuperTalent Introduces Industrial Grade 1.8” SSD
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 4:03P | Hard Drives/SSD | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Super Talent Technology, a leading manufacturer of flash storage solutions and DRAM memory modules, today announced their new MasterDrive KX3, a 1.8” SSD for the emerging notebook and tablet markets. As laptops get thinner and lighter, the demand for smaller, thinner components follows suit. The fact that this product is also silent, more rugged, has better performance and better battery life only adds to the allure of the mobile SSDs. This SATA II capable drive offers all those features and more. Requiring only 3.3V and measuring 5mm in thickness, the MasterDrive KX3 can perform sequential read/write speeds of 250 MB/s and 140 MB/s respectively. In smaller spaces, thermal concerns often arise but the MasterDrive KX3 can take the heat. Available as option, the KX3 can be built to handle extended temperature ranges from -40ºC to 85ºC.Encased in metal enclosure and designed with carefully selected extended thermal range components, the MasterDrive KX3 was engineered to withstand the full industrial temperature range. Super Talent is actively pursues the latest storage trends in the market and responds by creating products that push the envelope and meet the needs of our customers. Available now in capacity ranges from 32GB to 256GB.

G.SKILL RipjawsX F3-14900CL9Q-8GBXL Kit Review – Leading The Charge
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 4:02P | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
The memory market has seen a lot of fluctuation and change in the past year. RAM timings have gotten lower, performance has gotten better, and prices have submarined to a point where consumers can easily afford to fill their entire DIMM slots. Because of these market conditions, many memory manufacturers have slowed down their production, offerings, and some have even closed shop. After the dust has settled, the Taiwanese G.SKILL Team remains standing and, by the looks of the plethora of offerings in their DDR3 line-up, it is clear that they are in it for the long-haul.

Speedlink Snappy Wireless Mouse
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 4:01P | Mouse Pads | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Today we’re looking at a straight forward, simple mouse from Speedlink. It’s called the Snappy and just by looking at it you can see why, but looks alone won’t suffice. Let’s see how good it really is."

Corsair HX1050 1050 Watt Power Supply Review
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 4:00P | Power Supply | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
"Corsiar has been on a massive refresh of their various series of power supplies. We've covered just about everything they have to offer from the low output CX430V2 to the massive AX1200 and many in between. Today we are taking a look at another one of their higher end power supplies, the HX1050. As a part of Corsair's Professional series of power supplies, it is intended for those who demand high performance and high reliability. Corsair already has the HX1000 available, so many may ask as to why offer another power supply in the series that is capable of an extra 50W. The answer is simply that the HX1050 is completely different from the HX1000 and not just an old model with a few changes to lengthen the lifespan. With a single 12V rail, increased efficiency and a seven year warranty, the HX1050 is starting to look much more appealing than the aging HX1000. Read on as we cover the tech specs of the HX1050."

Sandybridge - Z68 Chipset - RST and Quicksync an Interview with Dan Snyder of In
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 2:40P | CPU / Processors | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
"HiTech Legion invited both Dan Snyder and Aaron Lau from Intel to a live phone interview which was recorded. The questions were asked and both Dan and Aaron answered. In this interview you will find out the thoughts behind the Z68 chipset, why it was not introduced first, and how all the technologies work together to offer the consumer a performance system at an affordable price."

DC01 Mini Network Storage Device Review
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 2:35P | Servers | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
"Given the advances in mobile devices whether it be tablets, phones or laptops the ability to access, update and maintain our content remotely is becoming more important. One company aiming to make this easy for us is SilverStone through their DC01 network storage device. Today we will be taking a look at the DC01 and finding out how it could improve our media experience when at home or out and about."

TTesports Dasher Gaming Mousepad
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 2:33P | Games | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
You can have an excellent mouse but with the wrong mousepad the mouse will not perform as well as it should. TTesports a subdivision of Thermaltake has released new gaming products and today we are taking a look at their latest mousepad named Dasher.

Corsair Announces New Enthusiast Series Modular PSUs
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 2:33P | Power Supply | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Enthusiast Series Modular PSUs share a platform with the award-winning Enthusiast Series TX V2 line, with the TX V2's fixed cable set upgraded to a modular cabling system consisting of an attached, fully-sleeved ATX 12V cable and a complete set of flat detachable cables that allow system builders to use only the cables they need. Enthusiast Series Modular PSUs are 80 PLUS® Bronze certified, delivering at least 85% efficiency at 50% load. Designed for reliable operation in high-performance PCs where clean, stable power is important, they are rated for full continuous power delivery at 50° C. Ultra-quiet, 140mm double ball-bearing fans deliver excellent airflow with exceptionally low noise levels by automatically adjusting fan speed in response to system temperature.

Mionix NAOS 5000 Gaming Mouse & Propus 380 Mouse Mat Review
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 2:25P | Mouse Pads | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
"Let's start off with me admitting that before I had started this review, I had never heard of Mionix. As I was offered the mouse for review, I did my usual bit and started checking out their products, website and various other user reviews and thoughts. I looked at their website for the NAOS 5000 and thought it looked plain and wrote it off as a mouse that would be mediocre at best. Oh, how wrong I was. The NAOS 5000 upon first hands-to-mouse action is lackluster. I think this is because your hand builds a bond to whatever mouse you use. Think about it, you might use your mouse 20 - 30 hours per week; it kinda molds to your hand and becomes one with you. Changing this is like buying a new pair of shoes. Sure, they feel great, but it feels like you're cheating on your old pair."

iBUYPOWER BTS11 Budget Gaming Rig
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 2:25P | Computer / SFF PCs | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
The BTS11 system is packed with some of the custom components featured in their sale and weighs in at $999. But can a sub $1000 rig assembled professionally really be considered a "gaming rig"?

ASUS 6870 DirectCU video card
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 12:03P | Video Cards | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
The DirectCU line of cards from ASUS are catered to the overclockers out there in the market. The DirectCU has precision mounting, putting the copper heatpipes in direct contact with the GPU for better cooling performance. ASUS has also implemented their SAP, Super Alloy Performance technology, which uses high quality capacitors, MOSFETs, and chokes along with ASUS’s super hybrid engine. They have also equipped the 6870 with multiple sets of input fuses on the circuit board to eliminate any chance of excessive or dangerous temperature rises, which should keep you from frying your video card. The 6870 DirectCU also comes factory overclocked from ASUS to 915MHZ, compared to the stock speed of 900MHz on basic 6870 cards.

ASRock Fatal1ty Z68 Professional Gen3 Motherboard
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 12:02P | Motherboards | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
"So far, ASRock has released four motherboard models based on the Intel Z68 chipset. The Fatal1ty Z68 Professional Gen3, which is the model we are taking a look at, is the highest-end model offered by ASRock. The manufacturer also offers a mainstream model, the Z68 Pro3, a top mid-range model, the Z68 Extreme4, and a miniATX model, the Z68 Pro3-M."

Silverstone Raven 3 Performance Case
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 12:01P | Cases | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
"When you think of performance computer cases, some things that usually come to mind are high price tags, large physical sizes, and lots of other great features you can only drool over but can rarely afford. Silverstone came out with their performance line, the Raven series, a couple years back and showed that they too can make a great performance case. The original two Raven cases sold for between $180CDN and $230CDN - certainly out of reach of most aspiring PC enthusiasts. Recently, Silverstone has taken some of the most popular features from the more expensive Raven 1 and Raven 2 cases and they've introduced the Raven 3. The Raven 3 sells for only $135CDN, which puts it in line with typical high end mid-towers - certainly not high performance cases like we've seen from the past two Raven cases."

General News NEWS PAGE: of 2154    
Hardware Sections     03/22/2018 | 3:55AM  
Beginners Guides
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Computers / SFF PCs
Cooling - Heatsinks
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Technology Content    
Beginners Guides: 99 Performance Tips and Tweaks for Windows
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Samsung ATIV Book 9-Lite NP915S3G-K01 13.3-inch Touch Screen Notebook Review
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Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex TV HD Media Player Review
Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex TV HD Media Player Review
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Beginners Guide: Install/Remove Intel Socket LGA1156 CPU and Heatsink
Beginners Guide: Install/Remove Intel Socket LGA1156 CPU and Heatsink
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Beginners Guides: Repairing a Cracked / Broken Notebook LCD Screen
Beginners Guides: Repairing a Cracked / Broken Notebook LCD Screen
Oct 02 | Beginners Guides
A broken or cracked LCD screen makes a laptop utterly useless, good thing PCSTATS can show you how to replace that busted laptop screen with a minimum of fuss and for less money than a service center charges. PCSTATS will be fixing a cracked LCD screen on a Lenovo T530 ThinkPad notebook, the general procedures outlined here work for any notebook though.
Gigabyte GA-X79-UD5 Intel X79 LGA2011 Motherboard In-Depth Review
Gigabyte GA-X79-UD5 Intel X79 LGA2011 Motherboard In-Depth Review
Jul 27 | Motherboards
The Gigabyte GA-X79-UD5 is an awesome 'Sandy Bridge-E' motherboard for anyone in the business of content creation, yet still nimble enough to take on multi-videocard gaming and overclocking at the end of a days work.
Seagate Constellation ES 1TB Enterprise Hard Drive Review
Seagate Constellation ES 1TB Enterprise Hard Drive Review
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All Constellation ES drives are rated to 6Gb/s SATA III speeds, incorporate 64MB of cache, utilize 7200RPM spindle speeds and offer Native Command Queing. The drives are covered by an impressive 5 year warranty and rated to1.2 million hours MTBF.
MORE » Complete PCSTATS Article and Review Listings...

The best Guides by the best writers on the internet; PCSTATS Beginners Guides explain computers, software, and all those other wonderful things that cause you frustration.

Learn how to use your computer better, master the internet while protecting yourself, and know what to do when your hard drive kicks the bucket.

  1. 10 Steps to a Secure PC
  2. 101 Tips and Tweaks for Windows XP
  3. 104 Killer Tech Tips for Windows XP
  4. 99 Performance Tips for Windows XP
  5. 99 Windows Vista Performance Tips
  6. Annual PC Checkup Checklist
  7. Assembling Your Own PC
  8. Back up and Restore Data in WinXP
  9. Browser Hijacking and How to Stop it
  10. Building a Home Theatre PC / HTPC
  11. Burning CDs and DVDs
  12. Cloning WindowsXP
  13. Converting Videotape Into Video Files
  14. Crash Recovery: The Blue Screen of Death
  15. Creating a Weblog / Blog
  16. Creating MP3 Music Files
  17. Decrypting Lost Document & Zipped File Passwords
  18. Diagnosing Bad Hard Drives
  19. Diagnosing Bad Memory
  20. Downgrading Windows Vista Back To Windows XP
  21. Dual OS Installation of WindowsXP 32-bit/64-bit
  22. Encryption and Online Privacy
  23. Ergonomics & Computers
  24. Flashing a Video Card BIOS
  25. Flash Memory Data Recovery and Protection
  26. Firewalls and Internet Security
  27. Firewall Setup and Configuration
  28. Forgotten Passwords & Recovery Methods
  29. Formatting and Partitioning a Hard Drive
  30. Fundamentals of Upgrading a PC
  31. Hard Drive Data Recovery
  32. Home Networking and File Sharing
  33. How to Install: Intel Socket 775 CPU and Heatsink
  34. How to Install: Intel Socket 1366 CPU and Heatsink
  35. How to Install: Intel Socket 1155 CPU and Heatsink
  36. How to Install: AMD Socket AM3 CPU and Heatsink
  37. How to Install: AMD Socket FM1 CPU and Heatsink
  38. How to Fix Homesite Design Mode to Work in WindowsXP/ Vista
  39. How To Make a Budget Desktop Computer on the Cheap
  40. How to Update a Motherboard BIOS
  41. Installing RAID on Desktop PCs
  42. Installing Windows Vista
  43. Installing Windows XP
  44. Internet Connection Sharing
  45. Legally Copying Software and Music
  46. Linux Part 1: Getting Familiar
  47. Linux Part 2: Installing a PC
  48. Linux Part 3: New Software
  49. Little Known Features of WindowsXP
  50. Making Old Software Compatible with Windows Vista
  51. Making DVD Movies from Video Files
  52. Most Common Ways to Kill a PC
  53. Optical Drives & Recording Formats
  54. Overclocking the CPU, Motherboard & Memory
  55. Overclocking the Videocard
  56. Preventing Data Theft from a Stolen Laptop
  57. Printer Sharing on a Home Network
  58. Quick Guide for Eliminating Spyware and Hijacker Software
  59. RAM, Memory and Upgrading
  60. Registry: Backups, Repairs, and Protection
  61. Remote Access to Computers
  62. RSS Feed Setup & Subscriptions
  63. Safe Mode in Windows Vista For Crash Recovery
  64. Setting up an FTP Server in WinXP
  65. Slipstreaming WindowsXP with Service Pack 2
  66. Spyware Protection and Removal
  67. Stopping Spam
  68. Stopping Vista From Thrashing Hard Disks to Death
  69. Synchronizing Files and Folders
  70. Unattended Windows 2000/XP Installations
  71. Understanding & Creating Batch Files
  72. Understanding & Tweaking WindowsXP Services
  73. Upgrading A Motherboard Without Reinstalling
  74. Upgrading Win98 to Windows XP
  75. USB Memory Drive Projects & Tips
  76. VPNs and Internet Connection Security
  77. Website Hosting From A Home PC
  78. Website Hosting With Apache
  79. Windows Vista Crash Recovery and Repair Install
  80. Windows XP Command Prompt
  81. Windows XP Safe Mode Explained
  82. Wireless Home Networking
  83. Wireless Network Security
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